It Can Never Never Be

https://player.vimeo.com/video/29392846


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Writing since ancient times, blogging, e-commercing, and site installing-designing-maintaining since 2001; WordPress theme and plugin configuring and developing since 2004 or so; a lifelong freelancer, not associated nor to be associated with any company, publication, party, university, church, or other institution. 

By CK MacLeod

Writing since ancient times, blogging, e-commercing, and site installing-designing-maintaining since 2001; WordPress theme and plugin configuring and developing since 2004 or so; a lifelong freelancer, not associated nor to be associated with any company, publication, party, university, church, or other institution. 

14 comments

  1. The word “exist” comes from a Greek word that means “to be apart.” So, for example, Shiva is non-existent because he-she-it is not apart from anything. Shiva represents non-existence from a yogic perspective, in fact, for reasons having to do with inseparability.

    1. Heidegger made much of that etymology. You can often tell a Heideggerian by an occasional insistence on spelling “exist” with a hyphen: “ek-sist.” The problem with the term “separate” is that it’s self-contradictory: The term itself joins the things it is meant to describe as separated. So that means both that there are different kinds of separateness and that discourse, language not only does join but may be the joining of the separate in an equally primordial way, as the structure of more-than/beyond-being (infinitude).

      1. That goes to my issue with so-called non-dual spiritual practice. The non-dualists become great dualists and the dualists become great non-dualists.

          1. Since you stand with the so-called non-dualists, I presume that you take exception to that side of the compliment, so here’s a bit of support for my presumption:
            Non-dualists express their brilliant dualistic understanding with ideas like the samsara-nirvana concept, the ultimate truth and relative truth awareness, and the realism vs nihilism middle path perspective on reality.

    1. Thank you, bob. I was wondering a little whether I had to put things in even blacker-whiter.

      Not going to belabor it all, and will let some dust settle as I keep my eyes open for a CARRIE ending and scope out my situation, which I would put at uncertain at best, probably not very good even by my customary reduced standards, but not necessarily Code Red..

  2. Scott Miller:
    :
    Non-dualists express their brilliant dualistic understanding with ideas like the samsara-nirvana concept, the ultimate truth and relative truth awareness, and the realism vs nihilism middle path perspective on reality.

    And these ideas are taken as ideas, therefore not definitive.

    1. Establishing the difference between what is merely ideological as opposed to definitive is, of course, dualistic, and once again, I praise you for it as another example of a non-dualist being great at dualism. Personally, I don’t see the difference, but that’s because I’m a supposed dualist who’s naturally connected to non-dualism.

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