general comments on web design philosophy (return of the blog)

(While working on a new about/contact page for this blog, I found myself needing to make some general comments on my web design/development philosophy. The relevant portions follow.)

The Yoga Instructor Registry (The YIR), a membership site built up from a simple WordPress installation, is my most recent web design and development project.

My other past and ongoing projects include professional, private, and e-commerce web sites mainly based on open source frameworks, especially OSCommerce and WordPress. Some samples:

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My design philosophy is to keep things simple, not to aim for anything too slick and flashy, since slick and flashy gets old and even dysfunctional, and since some design trends seem more about designers showing off for clients than about a sensible relationship between means and aesthetic and intellectual ends. I like a human, or organic, or physical sense for a site, sometimes tending to skeuomorphism – erring on the side of familiar and user-friendly, especially with older and non-technologically inclined internet users in mind.

For literary projects, I think a good design is a design that you can stop thinking about, and that presents the content in a way that will not suffer loss of intelligibility and meaning if transferred to paper or some other site-independent format. On the other hand, web-specific functions especially in a desk or laptop rather than small-mobile (i.e., 5″ screen) context – with buttons to push and links to click – deserve to have dimensionality if they refer the user to a different kind of relationship than that of a reader.

Still, though I look forward to an eventual countertrend to flat-mobile-things, I do see a lot of blogs and other sites that could stand updating and customizing: There’s retro or conservative design, and then there’s ugly because no one had the frameworks, the code, and the bandwidth to get un-ugly. A small counter-trend or counter-wave, or return to the personal weblog as mode of self-expression in its own right, probably won’t and shouldn’t be a return to anybody’s blog ca. 2005.


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Writing since ancient times, blogging, e-commercing, and site installing-designing-maintaining since 2001; WordPress theme and plugin configuring and developing since 2004 or so; a lifelong freelancer, not associated nor to be associated with any company, publication, party, university, church, or other institution. 

2 comments on “general comments on web design philosophy (return of the blog)

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  1. I agree with you that while designing website it’s important to make website more simple and easy to understand .The words should be easily understood by the readers so as to get targeted traffic.Get some designing ideas from Loungelizard professionals . .

  2. I must say that every designer should be careful about the quality in terms of section alignments and good call to action buttons so that user easily get what one wants while designing any website.

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So, does Mitchell make any money on the work, which has been shared so many times? He uploaded a high-res image of the symbol and granted permission for anyone to use it personally for free. But for those who want to support his work or simply want something readymade, you can also buy T-shirts, sweatshirts, mugs, and journals emblazoned with the symbol through Threadless.“I really just want to spread the image as much as possible and cement it in history,” Mitchell says. “In all honesty, the amount I’ve made from my Threadless shop so far is still less than my hourly rate, so I don’t really see it as a big deal. If you look at my Twitter, half the replies are people wanting to know where they can buy a shirt. Threadless is happy to help them out with that, and so I’m happy to let that happen.”Now that the symbol has flooded our streets and our timelines, Mitchell just has one request: “Impeach this idiot already,” he says.

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This is a Waterloo moment for Trump, the tea party and their alliance.  They have been stopped in their tracks not only by Democratic opposition but because of a mutiny within their own ranks. Although never particularly liked or respected, it is now clear that they are no longer feared. The bankruptcy of their ideas and their incompetence have been exposed. Their momentum has been dissipated. Their rejection of political norms has itself been scorned. Our long national nightmare may finally be coming to an end.

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One seasoned Democrat told me that among the reasons Trump won in 2016 was that a long year of Crooked Hillary talk, about emails and Goldman Sachs and the like, had steadily demoralised and demobilised the liberal base. If sustaining fury at Trump helps keep those same voters energised, so they eventually turn out to defeat him, it’ll be worth it, he says.

But it can’t just be in the form of world-weary, if witty, tweets. What’s needed is a coherent argument, one that explains why Trump’s repulsive behaviour matters. For Americans, that will surely centre on the state of their society. The civic realm is being degraded by Trump’s lies, vanities and insults. The national conversation is being coarsened. The basic democratic assumption, that disagreements can be resolved through discussion rather than coercion and violence, is being eroded from the very top. Note the language of Scaramucci’s outburst: “I want to fucking kill all the leakers.”

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CK MacLeod
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+ BTW, I recently upgraded some this and that on the back end of the blog, and it does seem to make comments post much faster [. . .]
Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress
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For WordPress self-hosted people, there is already a "restore legacy editor" plugin, even though Gutenberg hasn't been installed yet as the default.

Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress
CK MacLeod
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+ I thought you were on WordPress.com, not self-hosted WordPress. I can't find any info on WordPress.com and Gutenberg or Gutenbergerish editing, so I don't know [. . .]
Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress

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