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WordPress Plug-In Notes

  1. Realizing the Commentariat (May 8, 2015)
  2. Child of Mog; Extraordinary Comments (May 25, 2015)
  3. Patronize 'Em: WordPress Draft Post Docket with Subscription and Donation Options (June 9, 2015)
  4. Realizing The Commentariat: Phase 2 (June 22, 2015)
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  6. Spoiling you some more (August 5, 2015)
  7. Testing Ajaxified Comments - Experiment Halted (August 11, 2015)
  8. New New Since Last Visit Comments Comments (August 16, 2015)
  9. WordPress Comment Nesting Unbound (August 22, 2015)
  10. The Snake Is Implemented (August 25, 2015)
  11. Comments Since Last Visit Reloaded, Reloaded, Testing Post (August 31, 2015)
  12. Comments Since Last Visit, Reloaded, Augmented, Installed, In Two Steps (September 13, 2015)
  13. Coming Soon (I Think!): Author Bios (September 25, 2015)
  14. How to Do Backlinking Footnotes (November 30, 2015)
  15. Who or What Is Using "Commenter Archive" and "commenter-thread"? (February 16, 2016)
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  19. Finding Lost WordPress Widgets after Core Upgrade (March 21, 2016)
  20. Plug-In Away... and the Iron Law of Irony (April 16, 2016)
  21. To o-b or not to o-b (output-buffering in WordPress) - UPDATED (April 24, 2016)
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  23. Getting Right with Image Rights: WP Replace Unlicensed and Broken Images Plug-In (June 17, 2016)
  24. Getting Right with Image Rights: Workflow and Major Minor Upgrade (June 27, 2016)
  25. Getting to Better WordPress Twitter oEmbed (June 28, 2016)
  26. An Alliance of Digital Artists (Art and Work in the Age of Instant Reproducibility) (July 8, 2016)
  27. Comparative Page Loads with and without Image Errors (July 14, 2016)
  28. jQuery-Filling an Input Box in WordPress Admin (July 15, 2016)
  29. Drilling a Hole in the Universe with WP_Query in a Shortcode (September 1, 2016)
  30. Troll-Stomping and Other Sensible Things: #WordPress Plug-In Beta Test/Preview (November 12, 2016)
  31. Commenter Ignore Button Preview Video (November 30, 2016)
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  33. Commenter Ignore Button 0.99 (December 21, 2016)
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Noted & Quoted

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To take power, May had to pretend that she, too, dreams these impossible dreams. And that led her to embrace a phony populism in which the narrow and ambiguous majority who voted for Brexit under false pretences are be reimagined as “the people.”

This is not conservatism—it is pure Rousseau. The popular will had been established on that sacred referendum day. And it must not be defied or questioned. Hence, Theresa May’s allies in The Daily Mail using the language of the French revolutionary terror, characterizing recalcitrant judges and parliamentarians as “enemies of the people” and “saboteurs.”

This is why May called an election. Her decision to do so—when she had a working majority in parliament—has been seen by some as pure vanity. But it was the inevitable result of the volkish rhetoric she had adopted. A working majority was not enough—the unified people must have a unified parliament and a single, uncontested leader: one people, one parliament, one Queen Theresa to stand on the cliffs of Dover and shake her spear of sovereignty at the damn continentals.

...Brexit is thus far from being a done deal: it can’t be done without a reliable partner for the EU to negotiate with. There isn’t one now and there may not be one for quite some time—at least until after another election, but quite probably not even then. The reliance on a spurious notion of the “popular will” has left Britain with no clear notion of who “the people” are and what they really want.

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The most extraordinary paragraph in this op-ed, however, is this one:

The president embarked on his first foreign trip with a clear-eyed outlook that the world is not a “global community” but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage. We bring to this forum unmatched military, political, economic, cultural and moral strength. Rather than deny this elemental nature of international affairs, we embrace it.

...First — and this is so obvious I can’t believe I have to type out these words — the United States can’t simultaneously proclaim “America first” and then claim any kind of moral strength. Saying loudly and repeatedly that American values are not going to be a cornerstone of American foreign policy strips you of any moral power whatsoever.

The second and bigger problem is that the “embrace” of a Hobbesian vision of the world by the most powerful country in the world pretty much guarantees Hobbesian reciprocity by everyone else. Most international relations scholars would agree that there are parts of the world that fit this brutal description. But even realists don’t think it’s a good thing. Cooperation between the United States and its key partners and allies is not based entirely on realpolitik principles. It has helped foster a zone of stability across Europe, North America and the Pacific Rim that has lasted quite some time. In many issue areas, such as trade or counterterrorism or climate change, countries gain far more from cooperation than competition.

Furthermore, such an embrace of the Hobbesian worldview is, in many ways, anti-American.

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The rise of the military, if coupled with the undermining of civilian aspects of national power, demonstrates a spiritual exhaustion and a descent into Caesarism. Named after Julius Caesar — who replaced the Roman Republic with a dictatorship — Caesarism is roughly characterized by a charismatic strongman, popular with the masses, whose rule culminates in an exaggerated role for the military. America is moving in this direction. It isn’t that some civilian agencies don’t deserve paring down or even elimination, nor is it that the military and other security forces don’t deserve a boost to their financial resources. Rather, it is in the very logic, ideology, and lack of proportionality of Trump’s budget that American decline, decadence, and Caesarism are so apparent.

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State of the Discussion

+ (Well, I didn't, four years ago, call Daniel Larison a vulgar ideologue. I suggested that his polemic on that occasion stooped to that level, in [. . .]
note on anti-Americanist conservatism in re Obama in Israel
CK MacLeod
Comments this threadCommenter Archive
+ Thanks, Mr. McK. I don't see the Rs in any better a position, nor the independents for that matter. All the People's Political Scientists and [. . .]
Jennifer Rubin: Pro-Trump Republicans will get nothing, not even retention of a House majority – The Washington Post
Wade McKenzie
Comments this threadCommenter Archive
+ It's a common tactic in scholasticism (vide Edward Feser) to take a term of religio-philosophical significance (such as "creation" or "eternity") that has a commonly [. . .]
note on anti-Americanist conservatism in re Obama in Israel

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