Troll-Stomping and Other Sensible Things: #WordPress Plug-In Beta Test/Preview

commenter_highlight_ignore_archives

Comment Author Area with Ignore, Highlight Commenter, Highlight Comment, Comments This Thread, and Commenter Archive Buttons

Tis a frequent though by no means widely indulged ask from commenters, especially when a request to ban or at least warn some annoying other-commenter has been rejected. Why can’t we have an “ignore” button? Usually, the answer is, “We can’t because we can’t: Putting someone on ignore is an old-fashioned chat-room or forum thing, or maybe a Twitter blocking or muting thing – we’re just a blog!”

Yet it occurred to me the other day or week that it wouldn’t be hard to create a jQuery-enabled ignore button, and it wouldn’t be too hard to add cookies to make the ignoring persistent, and it wouldn’t be too hard to un-ignore, too. While I was at it, and feeling that enabling ignore was kind of negative, how about making it possible to highlight commenters using about the same methods used to ignore them, or particular comments, so they’re easy to pick out in a thread?

It didn’t take terribly much finagling to make ignore and highlight buttons, and I’ve already reserved a place in the WordPress Repository for the pair of plugins. For the purposes of this blog, I’ve combined them with new versions of the Comments-This-Thread and Commenter-Archive buttons I’ve had here for a while (and recently, embarrassingly, discovered I’d mis-implemented – a full-fledged Commenter Archives plug-in will be a project for another day).

I think how to use the features will become fairly obvious, though, be warned, they may work imperfectly or not at all if you’re using some weird old browser or have cookies disabled. Also, don’t worry about hurting someone’s feelings or encouraging the wrong kind of comment: Just in case it’s not clear, your ignores and highlights are visible only to you or maybe someone looking over your shoulder (or using your machine-browser). By the same token, the highlights and ignores are NOT transferable, though later on I may make such enhancements available to registered users.

So, please feel free to check the buttons out and give me feedback on this thread, or give an opinion on anything else you’d like to give an opinion on, and the rest of us can see about highlighting or ignoring it. Feel free to try them out on any other comment thread, for that matter. I know they’re kind of small, but, since they appear everywhere, I thought going large would be obtrusive, but tell me if you find them impractical. (I’m assuming someone will show up to play.)

Lanced Infinity

For the record, it should go like this:

1 – Hover over a button:

commenter_getting_highlight

2 – Ignore bob (actually, that’s the red button – which changes to green when it becomes an “un-ignore” button):

commenter_ignored

 

3 – No… un-ignore and highlight bob:

commenter_highlighted

4 – Wait, no – let’s just highlight bob’s comment.

comment_highlighted

5 – No we like bob in general and like this comment especially:

comment_and_commenter_highlighted

6 – We just have a lot of thoughts and feelings about that there comment:

comment_and_commenter_highlighted_and_ignored


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Writing since ancient times, blogging, e-commercing, and site installing-designing-maintaining since 2001; WordPress theme and plugin configuring and developing since 2004 or so; a lifelong freelancer, not associated nor to be associated with any company, publication, party, university, church, or other institution. 

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9 comments on “Troll-Stomping and Other Sensible Things: #WordPress Plug-In Beta Test/Preview

Commenting at CK MacLeod's

We are determined to encourage thoughtful discussion, so please be respectful to others. We also provide a set of Commenting Options - comment/commenter highlighting and ignoring, and commenter archives that you can access by clicking the commenter options button (). Go to our Commenting Guidelines page for more details, including how to report offensive and spam commenting.

  1. Unordered thoughts:
    1. This seems like a useful thing.
    2. Does an “X” icon really make sense? It kind of makes sense perhaps for ignore, but I don’t think it makes sense for highlighting the commenter or the comment, even if the X is a different color. I would probably use an audio “mute” button instead of the X for ignore. For highlight comment, I might choose a star. For highlighting the comment, I might use something like this: https://dribbble.com/shots/1462625-Follow-Button
    3. It seems to me like the tool tip takes a while to come up. Is there a delay built in, or is that my browser?
    4. Looking at the collection of buttons on the right hand side now, it seems to me like their organization needs to be reconsidered. Currently, there are five. It seems to me like the top row should be commenter-level functions while the second row should be comment-level functions. So, the top row should have (1) ignoring the commenter, (2) highlighting the commenter, (4) seeing the commenter’s archive. The second row should have highlighting the comment. The remaining icon for seeing the commenter’s comments on the the current thread could perhaps go in either one as prescribed by aesthetics.

    Of course, perhaps this is difficult. From a plugin perspective, it might be nice to have the icons related to a certain plugin all grouped together.

    (Just to clarify, this seems awesome. The above doesn’t subtract anything from that.)

    • Hey VB – thanks for that.

      I agree with your suggestion on alternative designs for the two kinds of highlight buttons – even a yellow box with a blue outline for comment-highlight, white box with blue outline and yellow shading, in other words imitating the current highlightification effects, might work. I also like the button you recommend – but I think I’d want it for a true “follow-this-commenter” function, somewhat as intended by the designer.

      Part of my thinking also, and a reason I went with place-holders for now, is that eventually I’ll have it in customizable form, inviting those inclined (among site operators, not among commenters) to substitute their own highlighting and button styles. Still, the initial release should be “excellent-as-is,” if possible, so I’ll work on that.

      Also occurred to me that I could add a sixth button, for “go to highlighted comments,” similar to the one at OT for scrolling through comments-since-last-visit.

      The delayed tool-tip sounds like it could be a browser artifact – anyway wasn’t intended. It’s just the normal “hover.” Anyway, should be insignificant once a user gets hip to what the buttons do.

      Don’t agree with you on the re-arrangement suggestion, but I’ll reflect on possibly more natural ones, and I appreciate your willingness to get down to the granular level. To me, the two archive functions belong together. I put comment-highlight at the top right, because it struck me as likely the one to be used most often, or the one I would use most often. The ignore/in-ignore button would, presumably, be used most infrequently, even if it’s the function possibly most desperately desired at some blogs.

      Anyway – thanks again for the detailed input.

      • I can see how button design might be the less interesting part of this problem.

        >add a sixth button, for “go to highlighted comments,

        Hmm, not sure I’m a fan of that yet. Maybe that’s because I continue to use the OT arrows you implemented. I guess any given site could implement either this type of arrows to go among highlighted comments or the other style arrows to visit new comments. Given that there is already highlighting that seems to work well, I don’t know that it’s needed. But I guess neither does that mean you can’t offer it if someone wants to implement it

        • Thanks again for the input, VB. I’ve adjusted the highlight button images, and have added a third state to make the “un-highlight” versions (and also the un-ignore button) more immediately obvious.

          I think that the “Go to Highlighted Comments” (or show Highlighted only, etc.) won’t be a sixth button, but possibly either one or both of the two Comments Since Last Visit initiator types: buttons at top and bottom of thread with go-to and/or show-only options; or clicker that appears next to highlighted comments.

          Eventually, I’ll want everything – including State of the Discussion, Extraordinary Comments, Nested Comments Unbound, Comments Since Last Visit, as well as Commenter Archives and more fab novelties in development – to fit modularly into a “Commentariat Suite,” including differentiated options for visitors vs registered users vs users-at-different-role-levels, but I think this might be an adequate start or close to it for the “free” versions of Commenter Ignore and Commenter Highlight.

          Can’t emphasize enough how helpful it has to have at least one thoughtful feedbacker as part of the pre-development process. (Some of the others seem confused about why I tweeted them!) So, more thanks…

          • added a third state to make the “un-highlight” versions (and also the un-ignore button) more immediately obvious

            Yes, this seems good.

            The highlight buttons also make some sense to me.

            The X does seem Ok to me, but I just want to show the sort of mute button I was referring to previously: https://www.google.com/search?q=mute+button&biw=1280&bih=739&tbm=isch&source=lnms

            By the way, is there some reason I’m not getting e-mails for this thread?

            • Hmm – I like the mute button, but I wonder if people are used to having them reflect current state (more typical for on-line or computer desktop audio controlsy) rather than “button action.” The red “x” seemed to me more suggestive of “delete this” and therefore for “positive action to negate.”

              As for the emails: Dunno – you’re signed up to receive all replies at a certain gmail account (I’m refraining from giving it out here). Could be you need to change the account, or your spam filter settings…

Commenter Ignore Button by CK's Plug-Ins

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WordPress Plug-In Notes

  1. Realizing the Commentariat (May 8, 2015)
  2. Child of Mog; Extraordinary Comments (May 25, 2015)
  3. Patronize 'Em: WordPress Draft Post Docket with Subscription and Donation Options (June 9, 2015)
  4. Realizing The Commentariat: Phase 2 (June 22, 2015)
  5. Pseudo-Redacting Spoilerer (July 25, 2015)
  6. Spoiling you some more (August 5, 2015)
  7. Testing Ajaxified Comments - Experiment Halted (August 11, 2015)
  8. New New Since Last Visit Comments Comments (August 16, 2015)
  9. WordPress Comment Nesting Unbound (August 22, 2015)
  10. The Snake Is Implemented (August 25, 2015)
  11. Comments Since Last Visit Reloaded, Reloaded, Testing Post (August 31, 2015)
  12. Comments Since Last Visit, Reloaded, Augmented, Installed, In Two Steps (September 13, 2015)
  13. Coming Soon (I Think!): Author Bios (September 25, 2015)
  14. How to Do Backlinking Footnotes (November 30, 2015)
  15. Who or What Is Using "Commenter Archive" and "commenter-thread"? (February 16, 2016)
  16. Enabling WordPress Press This for HostGator Sites (March 9, 2016)
  17. Linkback Your Xpost: A Simple WordPress Filter Function (March 14, 2016)
  18. Add Amazon Affiliate Tags to WordPress Posts <i>and</i> Comments Automatically (March 19, 2016)
  19. Finding Lost WordPress Widgets after Core Upgrade (March 21, 2016)
  20. Plug-In Away... and the Iron Law of Irony (April 16, 2016)
  21. To o-b or not to o-b (output-buffering in WordPress) - UPDATED (April 24, 2016)
  22. Output-Buffering and Extensible WordPress Plug-Ins (May 21, 2016)
  23. Getting Right with Image Rights: WP Replace Unlicensed and Broken Images Plug-In (June 17, 2016)
  24. Getting Right with Image Rights: Workflow and Major Minor Upgrade (June 27, 2016)
  25. Getting to Better WordPress Twitter oEmbed (June 28, 2016)
  26. An Alliance of Digital Artists (Art and Work in the Age of Instant Reproducibility) (July 8, 2016)
  27. Comparative Page Loads with and without Image Errors (July 14, 2016)
  28. jQuery-Filling an Input Box in WordPress Admin (July 15, 2016)
  29. Drilling a Hole in the Universe with WP_Query in a Shortcode (September 1, 2016)
  30. Troll-Stomping and Other Sensible Things: #WordPress Plug-In Beta Test/Preview (November 12, 2016)
  31. Commenter Ignore Button Preview Video (November 30, 2016)
  32. Is This Solution for Caches vs Cookies Going to Get Me in Trouble? (November 30, 2016)
  33. Commenter Ignore Button 0.99 (December 21, 2016)
  34. Adding wp.media Multiple Image Selection to WordPress Plug-Ins (January 5, 2017)
  35. Working around an Unexplained Failure of WordPress {$taxonomy} Hooks (January 10, 2017)In Progress: Subscribe!
  36. Better Twitter Embeds 2: Stripping the Convo for the Sake of the Convo (February 19, 2017)

Noted & Quoted

(0)

[C]limate scientists have a strange kind of faith: We will find a way to forestall radical warming, they say, because we must.

It is not easy to know how much to be reassured by that bleak certainty, and how much to wonder whether it is another form of delusion; for global warming to work as parable, of course, someone needs to survive to tell the story. The scientists know that to even meet the Paris goals, by 2050, carbon emissions from energy and industry, which are still rising, will have to fall by half each decade; emissions from land use (deforestation, cow farts, etc.) will have to zero out; and we will need to have invented technologies to extract, annually, twice as much carbon from the atmosphere as the entire planet’s plants now do. Nevertheless, by and large, the scientists have an enormous confidence in the ingenuity of humans — a confidence perhaps bolstered by their appreciation for climate change, which is, after all, a human invention, too. They point to the Apollo project, the hole in the ozone we patched in the 1980s, the passing of the fear of mutually assured destruction. Now we’ve found a way to engineer our own doomsday, and surely we will find a way to engineer our way out of it, one way or another. The planet is not used to being provoked like this, and climate systems designed to give feedback over centuries or millennia prevent us — even those who may be watching closely — from fully imagining the damage done already to the planet. But when we do truly see the world we’ve made, they say, we will also find a way to make it livable. For them, the alternative is simply unimaginable.

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(1)

They were concerned that any pre-election response could provoke an escalation from Putin. Moscow's meddling to that point was seen as deeply concerning but unlikely to materially affect the outcome of the election. Far more worrisome to the Obama team was the prospect of a cyber-assault on voting systems before and on Election Day. They also worried that any action they took would be perceived as political interference in an already volatile campaign. By August, Trump was predicting that the election would be rigged. Obama officials feared providing fuel to such claims, playing into Russia's efforts to discredit the outcome and potentially contaminating the expected Clinton triumph.

This, right here. This is where they choked. The American people had damned close to an absolute right to the information their government already had. The most fundamental act of citizenship is the right to cast an informed vote. The idea that the Obama administration withheld the fact that the Russians were ratfcking the election in order to help elect a vulgar talking yam is a terrible condemnation of the whole No Drama Obama philosophy. Would Donald Trump have raised hell if the White House released what it knew? Of course, he would have. But, as it was, the American people went to vote with only about half of the information they needed to assess his candidacy. This was a terrible decision.

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(0)

Changing views of U.S. presidents over past decade and a halfAs Pew Research Center’s global surveys from George W. Bush’s presidency illustrated, many of Bush’s key foreign policies were unpopular, and by the time he left office Bush was viewed negatively in most of the countries we polled. His successor, Obama, generally received more positive ratings throughout his White House tenure.Today, in many countries, ratings for President Trump look very similar to those for Bush at the end of his term. This pattern is especially clear in Western Europe. In the UK, France, Germany and Spain, the low levels of confidence in Trump are very similar to the poor ratings for Bush in 2008.

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State of the Discussion

CK MacLeod
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+ BTW, I recently upgraded some this and that on the back end of the blog, and it does seem to make comments post much faster [. . .]
Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress
CK MacLeod
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For WordPress self-hosted people, there is already a "restore legacy editor" plugin, even though Gutenberg hasn't been installed yet as the default.

Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress
CK MacLeod
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Comments this threadCommenter Archive
+ I thought you were on WordPress.com, not self-hosted WordPress. I can't find any info on WordPress.com and Gutenberg or Gutenbergerish editing, so I don't know [. . .]
Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress

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