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Yearning for President Blog – OAG #9

The Tweet-storm, in the new era of President Tweet, remains a nostalgia-inducing afterimage of the blog and of the era of President Blog, but it may also portend a return or attempted return to coherent, accountable, and consequential civic discussion in a mass society, back from the Great Flood of clicks.

Posted in Internet, Meta, notes, Operation American Greatness, Twitter Tagged with:

Oops…

Just a note for anyone who happened to note, or begin, the recently published (and unfinished) “Internal Contradictions of Liberal Democracy (Regime, 2 of 3)” post: I’d parked it in “Scheduled,” certain I’d have gotten back to it and the

Posted in Meta

Why two spaces after a period isn’t wrong (or, the lies typographers tell about history) – Heraclitean River

The author, Farhad Manjoo, is astounded to find so many educated and ignorant people who apparently believe that two spaces are okay. He even polls people over Thanksgiving dinner, just so he can tell them how wrong they are! The

Posted in Internet, Meta, Miscellany, Noted & Quoted

Housekeeping or Sorry about Tweeting Out that Rough Draft

I’d been thinking about putting up a “sorry I’m busy post,” anyway, especially since I haven’t been keeping up with “the Russian Angle” “link-posts,” but not having posted anything other than a web development note since the turn of the

Posted in Meta

Commenter Ignore Button 0.99

Now in “Late Beta” – and, for a limited time, I’ll offer free styling, installation, and configuration to anyone who wants to try it out!

Posted in Meta, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with:

Troll-Stomping and Other Sensible Things: #WordPress Plug-In Beta Test/Preview

It occurred to me the other day or week that it wouldn’t be hard to create a jQuery-enabled ignore button, and it wouldn’t be too hard to add cookies to make the ignoring persistent, and it wouldn’t be too hard to un-ignore, too. While I was at it, and feeling that enabling ignore was kind of negative, how about making it possible to highlight commenters using about the same methods used to ignore them, or particular comments, so they’re easy to pick out in a thread?

Posted in Meta, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

Plug-In Away… and the Iron Law of Irony

Seems fitting and probably should have been predictable – for a believer in the Iron Law of Irony – that an application meant to facilitate blogging, in this case by making aggregation of interesting material an easy “few clicks” operation, would annihilate my blogging. Anyway, is what happened.

Posted in Meta, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

You’re Welcome and Rightbackatcha

I learned a lot WordPressing at OT, and wish the best to everyone over there – a group that as a matter of fact still includes me, if in a much-reduced role. So, you’re welcome, and right backatcha.

Posted in Meta, Ordinary Times Tagged with:

1 Space: Awesome. 2 Spaces: Awful – A Test for a Certain Mr. Nosis – UPDATED

Good 1-space people may wish to avert their eyes.

Posted in Meta, Web Design Tagged with: ,

How to Make a (Basic) Ground Lizard Chili (Blogs in the Social Media Epoch)

It’s OK to be a lizard in an age dominated by insects.

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Meta, Ordinary Times Tagged with: , , ,

Noted & Quoted

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[C]limate scientists have a strange kind of faith: We will find a way to forestall radical warming, they say, because we must.

It is not easy to know how much to be reassured by that bleak certainty, and how much to wonder whether it is another form of delusion; for global warming to work as parable, of course, someone needs to survive to tell the story. The scientists know that to even meet the Paris goals, by 2050, carbon emissions from energy and industry, which are still rising, will have to fall by half each decade; emissions from land use (deforestation, cow farts, etc.) will have to zero out; and we will need to have invented technologies to extract, annually, twice as much carbon from the atmosphere as the entire planet’s plants now do. Nevertheless, by and large, the scientists have an enormous confidence in the ingenuity of humans — a confidence perhaps bolstered by their appreciation for climate change, which is, after all, a human invention, too. They point to the Apollo project, the hole in the ozone we patched in the 1980s, the passing of the fear of mutually assured destruction. Now we’ve found a way to engineer our own doomsday, and surely we will find a way to engineer our way out of it, one way or another. The planet is not used to being provoked like this, and climate systems designed to give feedback over centuries or millennia prevent us — even those who may be watching closely — from fully imagining the damage done already to the planet. But when we do truly see the world we’ve made, they say, we will also find a way to make it livable. For them, the alternative is simply unimaginable.

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They were concerned that any pre-election response could provoke an escalation from Putin. Moscow's meddling to that point was seen as deeply concerning but unlikely to materially affect the outcome of the election. Far more worrisome to the Obama team was the prospect of a cyber-assault on voting systems before and on Election Day. They also worried that any action they took would be perceived as political interference in an already volatile campaign. By August, Trump was predicting that the election would be rigged. Obama officials feared providing fuel to such claims, playing into Russia's efforts to discredit the outcome and potentially contaminating the expected Clinton triumph.

This, right here. This is where they choked. The American people had damned close to an absolute right to the information their government already had. The most fundamental act of citizenship is the right to cast an informed vote. The idea that the Obama administration withheld the fact that the Russians were ratfcking the election in order to help elect a vulgar talking yam is a terrible condemnation of the whole No Drama Obama philosophy. Would Donald Trump have raised hell if the White House released what it knew? Of course, he would have. But, as it was, the American people went to vote with only about half of the information they needed to assess his candidacy. This was a terrible decision.

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Changing views of U.S. presidents over past decade and a halfAs Pew Research Center’s global surveys from George W. Bush’s presidency illustrated, many of Bush’s key foreign policies were unpopular, and by the time he left office Bush was viewed negatively in most of the countries we polled. His successor, Obama, generally received more positive ratings throughout his White House tenure.Today, in many countries, ratings for President Trump look very similar to those for Bush at the end of his term. This pattern is especially clear in Western Europe. In the UK, France, Germany and Spain, the low levels of confidence in Trump are very similar to the poor ratings for Bush in 2008.

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State of the Discussion

+ BTW, I recently upgraded some this and that on the back end of the blog, and it does seem to make comments post much faster [. . .]
Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress

For WordPress self-hosted people, there is already a "restore legacy editor" plugin, even though Gutenberg hasn't been installed yet as the default.

Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress
+ I thought you were on WordPress.com, not self-hosted WordPress. I can't find any info on WordPress.com and Gutenberg or Gutenbergerish editing, so I don't know [. . .]
Gutenberg: The Invention of the Printing Press, the Destruction of WordPress

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