Religion

@bratchy1 : “Today I saw the messiah of hamsters” – Twitter

“Today I saw the messiah of hamsters” From: David Bratchpiece on Twitter: “Today I saw the messiah of hamsters https://t.co/ppJvQitcDK”

Posted in Noted & Quoted, Political Philosophy, Religion

Omar Ali (@omarali50): Islam is the rock on which the liberal order broke? – Brown Pundits

  [A]ll the other alternatives (most of them much stronger in “real-life” material terms than any Muslim country or party) like Great Russian Nationalism and its Orthodox Christian backstop, Chinese nationalism with Confucian and fascist characteristics, nascent Japanese nationalism, Hardcore

Posted in History, Noted & Quoted, On Liberal Democracy in Relation to Islamism, Religion

The End of the High Church – The Z Blog

What’s happening with the Catholic Church is it is following the same path as the Protestant churches. They are inviting in people from other religions, thinking they will be Catholic first and communist or Progressive second. It never works that way.

Posted in Noted & Quoted, Religion

Russell Moore: If Donald Trump has done anything, he has snuffed out the Religious Right – The Washington Post

These evangelical leaders have said that, for the sake of the “lesser of two evils,” one should stand with someone who not only characterizes sexual decadence and misogyny, brokers in cruelty and nativism, and displays a crazed public and private

Posted in Noted & Quoted, Politics, Religion Tagged with: ,

After Tweaking 29 Verses, Bible Translation Becomes Unchanging Word of God – Gleanings

Two of the ESV’s final changes were in Genesis, and evoked a slightly more complementarian reading. Genesis 3:16 was changed from “Your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you” to “Your desire shall be contrary

Posted in Books, Noted & Quoted, Religion

Jesse Walker: Two Kinds of Social Conservatism – Hit & Run – Reason.com

If you want to stave off a “majority-minority” America, and especially if you want to do this because you think it threatens your culture’s values, then you are trying to conserve central elements of your society. You are, in the

Posted in Noted & Quoted, Politics, Religion Tagged with:

Could we really call it a ‘temple’? – The Tepe Telegrams

As already noted in the beginning, we know little of the beliefs these people might have followed, so it would seem rather bold to denote these monumental pillar-statues as personifications of ‘deities’. But faceless, larger than life and highly abstract,

Posted in History, Noted & Quoted, Religion, Science

Sam Haselby: Why did the secular ambitions of the early United States fail? – Aeon Essays

In hindsight, American secularism has experienced both clear victories and stark defeats. The Anglo-Protestant heresy of making all members of the political community into Luther’s sovereign individuals has become something of an American orthodoxy. Who is more consistently certain that

Posted in Noted & Quoted, Political Philosophy, Religion

How Local Churches Anger The God Of Government – The Federalist

Throughout the book, Leeman maintains that the consensus between Protestant and Enlightenment thought has produced a confusion that is now eroding the very religious liberty the American founders sought to protect. As the culture wars escalate, so does the possibility

Posted in Books, Noted & Quoted, Political Philosophy, Religion

Prince’s Life of Faith – The Stream

A 2008 interview Prince gave to The New Yorker suggests this “clean, simple approach” left the singer a relatively strict social conservative who held the Bible as authoritative. “So here’s how it is: you’ve got the Republicans, and basically they want

Posted in Music, Noted & Quoted, Politics, Religion

From the Featured Archives

Noted & Quoted

TV pundits and op-ed writers of every major newspaper epitomize how the Democratic establishment has already reached a consensus: the 2020 nominee must be a centrist, a Joe Biden, Cory Booker or Kamala Harris–type, preferably. They say that Joe Biden should "run because [his] populist image fits the Democrats’ most successful political strategy of the past generation" (David Leonhardt, New York Times), and though Biden "would be far from an ideal president," he "looks most like the person who could beat Trump" (David Ignatius, Washington Post). Likewise, the same elite pundit class is working overtime to torpedo left-Democratic candidates like Sanders.

For someone who was not acquainted with Piketty's paper, the argument for a centrist Democrat might sound compelling. If the country has tilted to the right, should we elect a candidate closer to the middle than the fringe? If the electorate resembles a left-to-right line, and each voter has a bracketed range of acceptability in which they vote, this would make perfect sense. The only problem is that it doesn't work like that, as Piketty shows.

The reason is that nominating centrist Democrats who don't speak to class issues will result in a great swathe of voters simply not voting. Conversely, right-wing candidates who speak to class issues, but who do so by harnessing a false consciousness — i.e. blaming immigrants and minorities for capitalism's ills, rather than capitalists — will win those same voters who would have voted for a more class-conscious left candidate. Piketty calls this a "bifurcated" voting situation, meaning many voters will connect either with far-right xenophobic nationalists or left-egalitarian internationalists, but perhaps nothing in-between.

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Understanding Trump’s charisma offers important clues to understanding the problems that the Democrats need to address. Most important, the Democratic candidate must convey a sense that he or she will fulfil the promise of 2008: not piecemeal reform but a genuine, full-scale change in America’s way of thinking. It’s also crucial to recognise that, like Britain, America is at a turning point and must go in one direction or another. Finally, the candidate must speak to Americans’ sense of self-respect linked to social justice and inclusion. While Weber’s analysis of charisma arose from the German situation, it has special relevance to the United States of America, the first mass democracy, whose Constitution invented the institution of the presidency as a recognition of the indispensable role that unique individuals play in history.

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[E]ven Fox didn’t tout Bartiromo’s big scoops on Trump’s legislative agenda, because 10 months into the Trump presidency, nobody is so foolish as to believe that him saying, “We’re doing a big infrastructure bill,” means that the Trump administration is, in fact, doing a big infrastructure bill. The president just mouths off at turns ignorantly and dishonestly, and nobody pays much attention to it unless he says something unusually inflammatory.On some level, it’s a little bit funny. On another level, Puerto Rico is still languishing in the dark without power (and in many cases without safe drinking water) with no end in sight. Trump is less popular at this point in his administration than any previous president despite a generally benign economic climate, and shows no sign of changing course. Perhaps it will all work out for the best, and someday we’ll look back and chuckle about the time when we had a president who didn’t know anything about anything that was happening and could never be counted on to make coherent, factual statements on any subject. But traditionally, we haven’t elected presidents like that — for what have always seemed like pretty good reasons — and the risks of compounding disaster are still very much out there.

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