Using WordPress

Exterminating the Non-Breaking Space Bug

O layout mutilator! O blogger humiliator!

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Nested Comments Unbound 1.0 Now Available from the WordPress Repo

Enable open-ended maximum depth for nested comments, preserve comment-reply-links for all comments, keep the results readable.

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Better Twitter Embeds 2: Stripping the Convo for the Sake of the Convo

A few months ago, I noted a technique for stripping Twitter embeds of extraneous conversation, involving setting the tweet attribute “data-conversation” to “none.” What I provided was more hack than add-on, and required a somewhat laborious process of copying the

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Commenter Ignore Button Plug-In Now Available from the WordPress Repo

Commenter Ignore Button (CIB) lets a user to put one or more commenters “on ignore.” To have such an option enabled is a frequent request at blogs and other sites where comment threads are plagued by trolls or other problematic commenters, but where site operators prefer to err on the side of open discussion – or don’t want to get involved unless they really have to. Once users become generally aware of the option, people just seeking attention may either be more polite or move somewhere else, while regular commenters – and lurkers – may become more willing to engage.

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Ignoring in “Illdy”: A CIB Adaptation to a “Bootstrapped” Theme (Case Study)

If you’re not able to perfect your theme yourself, or not willing to hire a designer, then being a perfectionist is unrealistic. Yet just getting good enough on first glance results when adding CIB to customized comment templates, even before fine-tuning, may require some more complicated work. For those intimidated by the prospect, here is an example of curing the output on one typically atypical theme.

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Adding wp.media Multiple Image Selection to WordPress Plug-Ins

WordPress Multiple Image Selection in jQuery

Posted in Web Design, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

Commenter Ignore Button 0.99

Now in “Late Beta” – and, for a limited time, I’ll offer free styling, installation, and configuration to anyone who wants to try it out!

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Is This Solution for Caches vs Cookies Going to Get Me in Trouble?

I added the line to my jQuery script, and, *voila!*, WPSC, W3 Total Cache, and Comet Cache are all acting like I want them to. After I use the script, and reload, I get fresh pages.

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Commenter Ignore Button Preview Video

With this #WordPress Plugin I bestow upon humankind the greatest gift that has ever been given it so far…

Posted in Internet, Videos, WordPress Plug-Ins

Troll-Stomping and Other Sensible Things: #WordPress Plug-In Beta Test/Preview

It occurred to me the other day or week that it wouldn’t be hard to create a jQuery-enabled ignore button, and it wouldn’t be too hard to add cookies to make the ignoring persistent, and it wouldn’t be too hard to un-ignore, too. While I was at it, and feeling that enabling ignore was kind of negative, how about making it possible to highlight commenters using about the same methods used to ignore them, or particular comments, so they’re easy to pick out in a thread?

Posted in Meta, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

Drilling a Hole in the Universe with WP_Query in a Shortcode

Placing a post whose content would include a version of the post itself (containing a version of the post itself, and so on) produces a site-crashing “reset overload” (ERR_CONNECTION_RESET). It’s easy to create the danger inadvertently, but also easy to prevent.

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jQuery-Filling an Input Box in WordPress Admin

…on how I think a textbox should be filled in WordPress Admin… from simple anchor links… and when the content – in this instance long image links – is too long to be nicely contained… plus some little tricks and things I never noticed or noticed I’d noticed before…

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Comparative Page Loads with and without Image Errors

This benefit of WP-RUBI is additional to the one of avoiding “the $8,000 mistake” of using unlicensed images, but for some sites will be much more important. 

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Getting Right with Image Rights: Workflow and Major Minor Upgrade

I discovered many non-rights-cleared images that I now think may have detracted from the posts in some ways, even if they initially seemed to make them more attractive or striking.

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Getting Right with Image Rights: WP Replace Unlicensed and Broken Images Plug-In

A primary use for WP-RUBI will be at sites where administrators have decided to remove images that have been used either without permission or under lapsed or lapsing usage licenses: Proper employment will help to reduce or eliminate legal and actual “exposure” quickly and easily, without harming the site’s search engine rankings and while preserving posts as originally composed, allowing for eventual restoration.

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All-Nude Tweets (Hacking Extraneous Content from Twitter Embeds)

Tweet with conversation and card

The Twitter default is for “cards” and “conversation” to display, but you can get rid of them either tweet by tweet or through a copy-paste-search-and-replace-re-copy-paste.

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Output-Buffering and Extensible WordPress Plug-Ins

Contrary to my tentative conclusions of a month ago, I now understand at least one good reason to use output-buffering while writing WordPress code. Indeed, I now anticipate using the tool frequently.

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To o-b or not to o-b (output-buffering in WordPress) – UPDATED

My general impression is that, unless I have a very good reason for using it – probably involving the kind of script in which I’m not generally interested at this time – I should avoid it.

Posted in Using WordPress, Web Design Tagged with: , ,

Plug-In Away… and the Iron Law of Irony

Seems fitting and probably should have been predictable – for a believer in the Iron Law of Irony – that an application meant to facilitate blogging, in this case by making aggregation of interesting material an easy “few clicks” operation, would annihilate my blogging. Anyway, is what happened.

Posted in Meta, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

Noted & Quoted

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President Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, secretly worked for a Russian billionaire to advance the interests of Russian President Vladimir Putin a decade ago and proposed an ambitious political strategy to undermine anti-Russian opposition across former Soviet republics.

The allegations, if true, would appear to contradict assertions by the Trump administration and Manafort himself that he never worked for Russian interests.

Manafort proposed in a confidential strategy plan as early as June 2005 that he would influence politics, business dealings and news coverage inside the United States, Europe and the former Soviet republics, even as US-Russia relations under Republican President George W. Bush grew worse.

Manafort pitched the plans to Russian aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska, a close Putin ally with whom Manafort eventually signed a $10 million (£8 million) annual contract beginning in 2006, according to interviews with several people familiar with payments to Manafort and business records obtained by the AP.

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The texts, posted on a darknet website run by a hacktivist collective, appear to show Manafort’s family fretting about the ethics, safety and consequences of his work for Yanukovych. And they reveal that Manafort’s two daughters regarded their father’s emergence as a key player on Trump’s presidential campaign with a mixture of pride and embarrassment.

In one exchange, daughter Jessica Manafort writes “Im not a trump supporter but i am still proud of dad tho. He is the best at what he does.” Her sister Andrea Manafort responded by referring to their father’s relationship with Trump as “The most dangerous friendship in America,” while in another exchange she called them “a perfect pair” of “power-hungry egomaniacs,” and asserted “the only reason my dad is doing this campaign is for sport. He likes the challenge. It's like an egomaniac's chess game. There's no money motivation.”

By contrast, the Manafort daughters and their mother seemed much more unsettled about Paul Manafort’s work as a political consultant for Yanukovych’s Russia-backed Party of Regions, which is a subject of renewed interest among investigators probing possible links between Trump’s campaign and Russia.

In one March 2015 exchange that appears to be between the two sisters, Andrea Manafort seems to suggest that their father bore some responsibility for the deaths of protesters at the hands of police loyal to Yanukovych during a monthslong uprising that started in late 2013.

“Don't fool yourself,” Andrea Manafort wrote. “That money we have is blood money.”

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If there's anything mitigating the bad news for the White House here, it is that Comey may have also sent subtle signals that the matters under investigation are not principally about the personal conduct of Trump himself. While this is speculation, I do not believe that if Comey had, say, validated large swaths of the Steele dossier or found significant Trump-Russia financial entanglements of a compromising variety, he would have said even as much as he said today. I also don't think he would have announced the scope of the investigation as about the relationship "between individuals associated with the Trump campaign and the Russian government" or "coordination between the campaign and Russia’s efforts"; these words suggest one step of removal from investigating the President himself. If the latter were the case, I suspect Comey wouldn't have used words suggestive of the Flynn-Manafort-Page cabal.

But that's reading a lot into a relatively small number of tea leaves. What is clear is that this was a very bad day for the President. In it, we learned that there is an open-ended Russia investigation with no timetable for completion, one that's going hang over Trump's head for a long time, and one to which the FBI director is entirely committed.

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@CK_MacLeod

State of the Discussion

bob
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+ Yeah, I read C's comments as trying to do a variety of things at the same time, having the effect of making interpretation more difficult. Any [. . .]
Benjamin Wittes: How to Read What Comey Said Today – Lawfare
bob
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+ Sure, so why do they have "work Phones" they take home? Even if they don't have fate of the world responsibilities, who they work [. . .]
Isenstadt and Vogel: Paranoia seizes Trump’s White House – POLITICO

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