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Comments by Scott Miller
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On “Notes on the Invention of the World

@ fuster:
Right. Although, the rigid frog photo was really funny in a particular person kind of way. Only you could have posted it.

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@ Scott Miller:
Hold everything! How weird. I thought Fuster wrote the original post. Jesus. The avatar didn't come up originally, and I got it in my head that Fuster had written the post. So sorry. Wow. What a mix-up. I just noticed this. Then your computer problem probably kept you from noticing my original confusion. Oh, well. That was probably good.

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@ CK MacLeod:
I surmised all that. It's why I took it easy to begin with. The "dismissiveness" you felt actually may have stemmed from that passivity. I didn't want to make a big deal out of one little quote and I liked what Fuster did with it (especially since the last time Hegel came up, he really was dismissive). So I was juggling a lot of positions at once. Plus, I have second-hand Hegelian appreciation due to Ken Wilber. He combined Hegel and Buddhism successfully, and while my pushing of the Purposefulness-Playfulness duality didn't go so well, that way of addressing reality comes from Wilber's Hegelian ideas. Hence, I have no interest in shooting you. On the contrary, I want to help you help your dead friend with his project. I think it connects with my dead friend Ken Kesey's project. Kesey didn't protest Vietnam because he thought protesting was just a counter-purpose too relatable to the original purpose. He, therefore, took up playfulness describable as merry-pranksterism.

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CK MacLeod wrote:

I”m typing with a hand tied behind my back

One hand or two, I''m or no I'm, you're still the man.

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bob wrote:

So even with the (valorious) motivation to save the nation, the world, the universe (more and more abstract) we increase, as abstraction and valor increase, the likelhood of annihilating the nation, the world the universe

Right.

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@ CK MacLeod:
Okay. I'll roll and role with it. Sorry that I came off as dismissive. There is room for me being more playful and dynamic.

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@ CK MacLeod:
Hegel set up the example. I find the example wildly assertive. He's doing what you accuse me of doing. The advocacy is clear. He champions purposefulness by coming up with the idea that something is being "turned into valour." He's not just calling them as he sees them. He's projecting something onto something.
CK MacLeod wrote:

you throw up a counter-purpose that you merely refrain through a trick of language to characterize as such

Again, so does Hegel, and so do you here. That's my point. Without a counterbalancing amount of playfulness, all we ever get is "counter-purpose." There's nothing wrong with purposefulness. The problem is when it isn't balanced out with playfulness. Country Joe had a purpose. He expressed the purpose, but at the same time realized a state of playfulness. Your "keg" example is also an example of what psychologists refer to as "borderline" thinking. It fails to see the middle, where dynamic dualism takes place. You don't bring a keg of beer into class and call it playfulness. Obviously, a keg is brought in as a counter-purpose to the class. There's no real playfulness to it. There's only counter-purpose. If someone brings real playfulness into the class, it balance the purposefulness and can be expressive of valor. Country Joe expressed a counter-purpose, but not just that. He expressed playfulness as well and because of the dynamic dualism of that, he managed to create an expression that became universally powerful.

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Personal courage became impersonal...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBdeCxJmcAo

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The main prejudice I sense has to do with purposefulness. In every way, playfulness is equal to purposefulness. You express a wonderful awareness of that with your video posts and general humor. You also certainly understand purposefulness and are equally skilled at purposeful expression. So I blame Hegel here. There's a failure where dialectics are concerned. Championing purposefulness, he lost the True. There is nothing True without playfulness. Both things can be expressed at the same time, and I think an awareness of playfulness' value might lead to an understanding of how valor can't really be valiant without both things being expressed. A soldier dying for the universal takes things too seriously. Something is missing from the mix. Country Joe and the Fish having the guts to get up and sing their famous anti-war song uses the guitar and the human voice in a way that expresses valor much more completely than the one Hegel credits to gun usage.

On “to blog or not to blog or to notblog-blog

@ fuster:
No, no, no. You're supposed to post a video of a punk band yelling crazy shit loosely associated with Giant-stuff.

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@ fuster:
I feel the same way about the Giants. Critics are saying they should be more active in the free-agent market, but I think that would be like saying, "We just got lucky winning the World Series." It would be an insult to the players to act as if the team wasn't good enough as is. Even if it isn't, the right message is being sent. I love the fact that the Giants beat Holliday, Oswalt, and Lee in the playoffs. They don't scare us.

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@ fuster:
Okay. But I was hoping the Lee Ving video would help you get over Cliff. So Lee Ving is the collective Yankee yelling at Cliff Lee, "I don't care about you! Fuck you!"

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Okay, Lee Ving FEAR. New post:
TITLE: LEE VING
CATEGORY: YOGA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y96rVb3AEDg
(Note line about "Philadelphia" in video)

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Also, here's a new low in respect to our laziness. Instead of writing a new post, I'm going to put one here. It has the advantage of being buried in a mostly dead comment hole and will hopefully hurt Fuster's feeling less that way.
TITLE: LEE-VING
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjQElYPnL3I&feature=watch_response
Lee Ving was the lead singer of Black Flag, I think it was. To put a Black Flag video here I'll have to, I don't know, break the blog. That would be very punk.

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@ Scott Miller:
Wow. You gotta admit that lost part was cool.
Scott Miller wrote:

bob wrote:
@ CK MacLeod:</blockquote
There, there, fellas.

The "there, there, fellas" ending up in the quote too. Hope I didn't break the blog.

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bob wrote:

We’re always in the middle of the thing, moving from somewhere to anotherwhere, and only ever seeking to describe that movement. If we were entirely in the priorwhere or the nextwhere we would be unintelligible even to ourselves.
“There’s no there there.” Gertrude Stein Geographical History of America

bob
bob wrote:

bob wrote:
@ CK MacLeod:</blockquote
There, there, fellas.

On “Re: Puppetry

Scott Miller wrote:

fuster wrote:
It’s so great to be you.

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fuster wrote:

It’s so great to be you.

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That is exactly the answer I was looking for. It's so great to be you. Really. One of the things I like best about meditation is how it breaks down what yogis call the "I maker." In reading what you wrote, especially in reading what you wrote about what I wrote, I experiencing being you and it's great. There is no i in Colin. Oh, wait. There is actually an i in Colin. But you get the point.

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@ CK MacLeod:
The true ants of the world work from the ground up, supposedly. They get their credentials after working up from the ground to the point where they can come along and "embarrass" someone who has worked from the heavens down like yourself, but that doesn't make you a fake. It makes you capable of seeing every piece of art the way it should be seen. What makes an art piece true is its connection to the big picture, heaven, samadhi, consciousness on the whole that can be recognized by someone like you no matter what kind of art it is, and while an ant might come along to cause embarrassment, those artist who really deserve you as an advocate will know you for what you are: the real deal.
But, yes, I get you. It's about positioning. You are well positioned for writing about whatever you want to write about in whatever way you want to write about it. That freedom is an advantage to the writing. As far as the art of it is concerned, and you are, first and foremost, an artist, credentials are a burden. Everything that makes you an "expert" would be a burden. And as I have tried to communicate to everyone, the only issue is that so few of us get to really enjoy the full measure of your art. I feel particularly lucky to have gotten to read your scripts and poetry as well, but the best thing of all is getting to read what you write as you pose as a fake. I shouldn't even out you. I should leave well enough alone.

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CK MacLeod wrote:

“A Fire in My Belly,” being called “Ant Christ” by some, is a more complex piece with a different intention. It unfolds in time, something which the artist is running out of. That he uses up his vanishing life in part by repeating and reversing himself, over and over, and with obscure, never-to-be-explained, raw and ugly gestures seems to deepen the sense of waste, but waste is integral to his message: He’s becoming a wasted life, one of many wasted lives, declared “unclean” and tossed out with the garbage. Yet out of pain and loss and nightmare and nonsense he constructs a timeless space, an intimation of immortality shaped by an unflinching confrontation with death, with the reduction of life and funerary symbols to dead matter, as “trite” as ant trails.

Glad I pushed you into a further explanation. That is beautiful, and you succeed in making it clear why the piece is not in need of your rescuing it. Imagine what you could do if you weren't, in your opinion, "a fake."

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CK MacLeod wrote:

– as the inside of a 1992 John Proctor’s head, his pre- or extra-verbal subjectivity

That was what I was thinking.

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However, I do think it's worth offering up a creative comparison. I hold up Arthur Miller's work as an elevated standard. Even the Hollywood production of The Crucible is brilliant. Miller wrote the screenplay. Compare Wojnarowicz' piece with this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MGGhmG3-WQ

*Comment archive for non-registered commenters assembled by email address as provided.

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