Comments on 2012 – it’s the paradigm, stupid by Scott Miller

fuster wrote:

A large organization whose client list is not limited to one government is a rather imperfect tool of policy. The organization has its own agenda and is as no more likely to perform as an obedient servant of policy than as a semi-independent ally.

To put it lightly.

fuster wrote:

Me, I’m malformed that way

Funny video. But if you didn't check it out, the one CK posted is actually amazing if you watch the whole thing. I love it especially when he says, "Fuck boats."
http://andrewsullivan.thedailybeast.com/2011/08/mental-health-break.html
I tried over and over to quote Miggs' last comment. It was everything I expected. I'm going to maintain the peace and not comment, but...oh my god...what a sentence and what...I'm just shaking my head. It really deserves to be somehow immortalized as a literary representation of how things happened the way they have. Go Miggs.

miguel cervantes wrote:

The private military contractor, is a tool of Government policy, they are an adjunct, no matter how much bad pulp fiction, tries to paint it
as an adversary element, now this administration having gone after
our own cohort of what they consider ‘bitter clingers’ and simultaneous
serving as the armory for other less principled paramilitaries south of the border, has a touch of irony, which the Two Minute Hate against
NewsCorp has obfuscated.

miguel cervantes wrote:

The private military contractor, is a tool of Government policy, they are an adjunct, no matter how much bad pulp fiction, tries to paint it
as an adversary element, now this administration having gone after
our own cohort of what they consider ‘bitter clingers’ and simultaneous
serving as the armory for other less principled paramilitaries south of the border, has a touch of irony, which the Two Minute Hate against
NewsCorp has obfuscated.

miguel cervantes wrote:

The private military contractor, is a tool of Government policy, they are an adjunct, no matter how much bad pulp fiction, tries to paint it
as an adversary element, now this administration having gone after
our own cohort of what they consider ‘bitter clingers’ and simultaneous
serving as the armory for other less principled paramilitaries south of the border, has a touch of irony, which the Two Minute Hate against
NewsCorp has obfuscated.

@ fuster:
fuster wrote:

by pouring harsh chemicals down your toilet to burn out a clog

I do appreciate the imagery. You've earned a Sphincty for it.

@ fuster:
That does kind of ring a bell. But, okay. As you guys could probably tell, I was probably heading this toward some kind of point about how the idea of "spreading democracy" and contracting soldiers who don't answer to any governmental authority to help do the spreading is darkly twisted, so I commend you for keeping the peace and will go back to things about aliens or something.

@ CK MacLeod:
I was hoping Miggs might answer. It's a straight forward question--no Scorpio sneakiness at the ready.

@ miguel cervantes:
Was military contracting ever an issue outside of government circles before Iraq? Had civilians questioned the use of private militia before that or was it done in such small numbers no one noticed?

@ miguel cervantes:
I didn't know about Brown and Root. According to Wikipedia Halliburton bought KBR and from that source anyway, it seems that even though KBR got a lot of government contracts to build military infrastructures, it wasn't involved in "Blackwater" type militia operations. Certainly Iraq was the first war to be fought by anything close (over 50 percentage by 2004) to the numbers of private contractors Halliburton put there, and the contracts Cheney got Halliburton were what made its stock go through the roof. That's what I was referring to.

It seems clear that Republicans won the debt-ceiling scare, and when Republicans win stocks are supposed to go up. Of course, it's not that simple, but I think what's happening does point to the fact that Republicans aren't Republicans any more. In my opinion (and this is consistent with several article posts that CK shared), Obama is what used to qualify as a Republican. Strangely enough, Wall Street seems to know what kooks the Tea Party people are, and it makes sense that their victory would be recognized as being bad for the economy. Going back to when Wall Street was fat and happy, Clinton was clearly a capitalist of the first-order, having spread it to Russia in 1993 during a time when that country was most vulnerable to a privatization take-over. The only thing Bush-Chaney gave to Wall Street was Halliburton and Halliburton scared Bush. You can see that in the film-footage of him answering a press question about who was keeping Blackwater militia accountable. He said, "Help," and laughed, but the laugh was real in respect to its expression of vulnerability. So Wall Street had a strange relationship with Bush. I remember the moment I knew he was going to win. It was when I saw all the super "green" stocks I owned crash in a matter of minutes. Anyway, things are stranger than ever, but I think I'll pass on the fiddle. A nice yoga cave is what I'm looking for.