Series: WordPress Plug-In Notes

Realizing the Commentariat

Rough drafts for a “Commentariat” Suite

Posted in notes, Web Design, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

Child of Mog; Extraordinary Comments

1. Discussion continues at OT on the momentous question of replacing the Mystery Person. Though, dismayingly, the OGs are as so often caught up with matters of lesser import – as though anyone’s opinions at the blog on a so-called

Posted in Meta, notes, Web Design, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with:

Patronize ‘Em: WordPress Draft Post Docket with Subscription and Donation Options

Core functions completed and ready for testing, bells, whistles, and plug-innability, and code presentation still to come: A notification-enabled “Coming Soon” or “Works in Progress” or “Docket” feature. In fact, this very post will provide for initial on-line testing of the full cycle – presentation, subscription, confirmation, co-messaging, subscription cancellation, notification, removal of used subscription data.

Posted in Meta, Web Design, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: ,

Realizing The Commentariat: Phase 2

Submitted for your consideration and feedback: “State of the Discussion,” “Comments This Thread,” “Commenter Archives.” Also: Old-Yellering “Gifts of Gab.”

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: ,

Pseudo-Redacting Spoilerer

All will be revealed (if you want it that way).

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins

Spoiling you some more

Demonstrating some additional spoileration that writers (and in-the-know commenters) can use.

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins

Testing Ajaxified Comments – Experiment Halted

Testing “Ajaxified Comments’ which may or may not be pretty darn terrific added to the main site.

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Off the Cuff, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins

New New Since Last Visit Comments Comments

…changes in how comments “new since last visit” are defined and displayed.

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with:

WordPress Comment Nesting Unbound

Not a radical change – yet.

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with:

The Snake Is Implemented

Comment Snaking? The Unbounded Snake? WordPress Comments Ouroborosified? Still haven’t hit upon the just-right name, but she is here – the comment thread version of Santanico Pandemonium.

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with:

Comments Since Last Visit Reloaded, Reloaded, Testing Post

Just for testing cslvr

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins

Comments Since Last Visit, Reloaded, Augmented, Installed, In Two Steps

Comments Since Last Visit Highlighting (Thread-Specific) – Preserve As-New Formatting for Limited Time – Show Number of New Comments – Go To New Comments – Scroll Through New Comments – Show New Comments Only – Sort Ascending/Descending – Mark All Read (Start New Session)

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: ,

Coming Soon (I Think!): Author Bios

To be implemented as soon as this weekend…

Posted in Developing Ordinary Times, Ordinary Times, WordPress Plug-Ins

How to Do Backlinking Footnotes

At the point in the post where you want the number-link to appear, type a space then opening double parentheses. Place the text you wish to appear in the footnote after the double parentheses. Close the footnote with closing double parentheses.

Posted in Using WordPress, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: ,

Who or What Is Using “Commenter Archive” and “commenter-thread”?

If any of you human beings have anything to say on the major uptick in use of these commenting features, please let me know. The spiders and robots don’t answer questions directly.

Posted in Web Design, WordPress Plug-Ins

Enabling WordPress Press This for HostGator Sites

Solution of a problem for bloggers who want to use WordPress Press This on their “shared hosting” accounts at HostGator and possibly at other aggressively security-conscious web hosts.

Posted in notes, Web Design Tagged with: ,

Linkback Your Xpost: A Simple WordPress Filter Function

Line-by-line on how to write a WordPress filter function utilizing the “the_content” filter hook.

Posted in Web Design, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

Add Amazon Affiliate Tags to WordPress Posts and Comments Automatically

A helper function extending the WordPress Amazon Affiliate Tag (Amazify) plug-in to Comment as well as Post text.

Posted in WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

Finding Lost WordPress Widgets after Core Upgrade

Just a quick note on fixing problem affecting one of my favorite WordPress Plug-Ins in use at this site, and possibly affecting many others as well.

Posted in WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: ,

Plug-In Away… and the Iron Law of Irony

Seems fitting and probably should have been predictable – for a believer in the Iron Law of Irony – that an application meant to facilitate blogging, in this case by making aggregation of interesting material an easy “few clicks” operation, would annihilate my blogging. Anyway, is what happened.

Posted in Meta, WordPress Plug-Ins Tagged with: , ,

Noted & Quoted

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The most painful aspect of this has been to watch people I previously considered thoughtful and principled conservatives give themselves over to a species of illiberal politics from which I once thought they were immune.

In his 1953 masterpiece, “The Captive Mind,” the Polish poet and dissident Czeslaw Milosz analyzed the psychological and intellectual pathways through which some of his former colleagues in Poland’s post-war Communist regime allowed themselves to be converted into ardent Stalinists. In none of the cases that Milosz analyzed was coercion the main reason for the conversion.
They wanted to believe. They were willing to adapt. They thought they could do more good from the inside. They convinced themselves that their former principles didn’t fit with the march of history, or that to hold fast to one’s beliefs was a sign of priggishness and pig-headedness. They felt that to reject the new order of things was to relegate themselves to irrelevance and oblivion. They mocked their former friends who refused to join the new order as morally vain reactionaries. They convinced themselves that, brutal and capricious as Stalinism might be, it couldn’t possibly be worse than the exploitative capitalism of the West.

I fear we are witnessing a similar process unfold among many conservative intellectuals on the right.

Comment →
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The precarious feeling of uncertainty will nonetheless persist, at least until U.S. authority, in Europe or anywhere else, is seriously challenged. And there are signs that a challenge is coming. In the past few days, the Russian government has recognized passports from the phony “republics” that Russian-armed, Russian-controlled “separatists” have created in eastern Ukraine — perhaps, as one Russian official suggested, as a prelude to granting them Russian passports or even annexing the territories outright. Russian planes repeatedly buzzed a U.S. destroyer on patrol in the Black Sea. Most ominously, Russia has reportedly deployed a new generation of cruise missiles, a move that violates existing arms treaties and could make it easier for Russian bombs to reach European capitals.

There is no reason to think that these small “tests” will not be repeated. And if any one of them explodes into something worse, then talk of “shared values” will not help. Nor will repeated reassurances from Cabinet members. At some point, the enforced ambiguity will fall away, it will not be possible to disguise reality with “Swedish incidents” and we will learn what the president actually believes. I just hope that we are all prepared.

Comment →
(0)

Our partners in the international order we created - some of whom we conquered to make it possible - are now seeking to defend it from us. Let's say that again, Defend it from us. How do we now as loyal Americans look at the warnings of the French and the Germans, as well as the British and our other erstwhile allies' warnings? This is a complicated question which different people, depending on their professions and governmental responsibilities and personal dispositions, must answer in different ways. But we cannot ignore the fact that the American experiment is now in a kind of exile - taken refuge elsewhere - and the executive power of the American state now under a kind of, hopefully temporary, occupation.

We face a comparable dynamic at home. I have been thinking for weeks that the central challenge and reality of the Trump Era is what do you do as an institutionalist when the central institutions of the state have been taken over, albeit democratically, by what amount to pirates, people who want to destroy them? To put it another way, do the institutions and norms which Trump and his gang are trying to destroy become shackles and obstacles in the way of those trying to defend them? There['re] no easy answers to these questions.

Comment →

@CK_MacLeod

State of the Discussion

bob
Ignored
Comments this threadCommenter Archive
+ I dunno, I think a lot of people looked at the TPers not as patriotic Americans but as bat shit crazy. Their difficulty in [. . .]
On Emulating the TP vs Trump’s GOP
CK MacLeod
Ignored
Comments this threadCommenter Archive
+ They will still have to cope with a version of the same conflict at every stage and level. Sooner or later, or constantly, any political [. . .]
On Emulating the TP vs Trump’s GOP
bob
Ignored
Comments this threadCommenter Archive
+ Sure, that's a fair characterization of the discussion outlined in the tweets. My point is that the information we have about "the left" is [. . .]
On Emulating the TP vs Trump’s GOP

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