#Hegel

The Egological: Notes on Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit by Martin Heidegger

“The essence of the universe, at first hidden and concealed, has no power to offer resistance to the courageous search for knowledge; it must open itself up before the seeker, set its riches and its depths before his eyes to give him pleasure.”

Posted in Anismism, Featured, Philosophy Tagged with: ,

Voegelin’s Gnosis, Part 3: Anismism

The point at which the insight or observation of or insistence upon an “anism” or anti-gnosis converts into just another gnosis would be the central problem of anismism, the problem of anismism to itself, already foretold in the paradox of its name and the temptation to start tacking additional “isms” onto it: Anismismism would be very bad anismism as well as a bad joke, the false idol of the return to anism or the image of that return or the discourse of images of that return, and so on, rather than as the actual return to the anismic real.

Posted in Anismism, Featured, History, Philosophy, Religion Tagged with: , , ,

Notes on America in the Philosophy of World History: Ronald Reagan’s ‘A Time for Choosing’

The critique of neo-conservatism and of Reaganism, especially the right-libertarian critique from within conservatism, amounts to a critique of their shared Hegelianism.

Posted in Featured, History, Neo-Imperialism, Political Philosophy Tagged with: , ,

Feet First on Reagan, Neo-Conservatism, and Hegel

I was working on some spare-time notes for a period during which I do not in theory possess any spare time, and by now the notes are an unfinished opus. It struck me today that the footnotes to that not

Posted in notes, Political Philosophy Tagged with: , ,

replying to a comment on comments – part 1 (teleonomy)

(With apologies to john c halasz, who could not have anticipated in his comment responding to my comment, under my most recent post collecting comments, that I would decide to make a couple of posts out of my reply. I

Posted in History, notes, Philosophy Tagged with: , , , , ,

the latest dream of reason

Without examining alternative views of the technical questions, which I believe will all eventually resolve to problems of the will, or to philosophical problems, or as Hegel put it rather pictorially, to fallacies of the brain as bone, we can note that the presumption of an artificially super-intelligent (an)nihilism, or of produced objective yet absolutely negative being, is nothing other than the projection of the scientist’s own self-nullity, or the inability of reason, as Hume patiently explained to us, if ever to be ignored by the most of us, to discover a reason for its own existence.

Posted in Anismism, Books, Internet, notes, Philosophy, Technology Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Hell and Greater Israel (Blog Version)

Also to be found on Storify.

Posted in International Relations, War Tagged with: , , ,

McCarthy’s unusually actually reasonably conservative conservative foreign policy

Tweets of 2014.07.16

Posted in International Relations, Neo-Imperialism, notes, Twitterei Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

Order of orders: possibly last comment on Brooks-Schmitt, this one not posted at CT

…why Schmitt arguably does qualify as Hegelian, and why his two main practical-political projects, synthesis of his theological conservatism with ideological liberalism, and then with Nazism, were, despite superficial dissimilarities, versions of the same “political theological” project, which had to fail, as a committed opportunism lacking opportunity: He was a statist-conservative in an epoch of the (self-)destruction of the nation-state, a believer in “concrete order” whose own position was built on quicksand. Or you could say simply that he identified as an individual with a society bent on collective suicide. For Heidegger, it was something similar. For Brooks and contemporary Americanists of his broad type, there are distinct parallels, but on a different order of orders.

Posted in History, notes, Philosophy Tagged with: , , ,

Thesis of Theses (re Samuel Goldman on The Religious Origins of Liberalism)

We like to believe we are Lockean, but we suspect we are Machiavellian or on our best days Ciceronian, and we are ever-insecurely deluded about having evaded Hegel and Rousseau.

Posted in History, Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Politics Tagged with: , , , , , ,

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