#Sarah Palin

Long day’s blogging into evening – pre-game festivities

Am about to disappear into Lakerdom – either a further descent into tedious misery, a temporary revival on the way to even deeper misery, or the Turning Point we’ve been waiting for and falsely identifying this whole desperately non-compelling season

Posted in Economics, Philosophy, Religion, Sports, War Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Secrets of the Ancient Blogging Masters – The Day Trip

(kind of a sample post based on the “How To“) Amazon.com: Righteous Victims: A History of the Zionist-Arab Conflict, 1881-2001 (9780679744757): Benny Morris: Books Really, read this book.  Just finished the first world-scene-setting chapter that closes with the birth of

Posted in History, Miscellany, Science Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Palin’s got it made!

Ed Morrissey: Palin has near-saturation levels of name recognition, which puts her far ahead of other potential nominees… …a huge plus, since EVERYONE knows her, and EVERYONE has such a high opinion of her.  Of course, she doesn’t need a

Posted in Miscellany Tagged with: ,

The Backfire Continues

George Packer: The New Yorker: [It] won’t do to dig up stray comments by Obama, Allen Grayson, or any other Democrat who used metaphors of combat over the past few years, and then try to claim some balance of responsibility

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Slammin’ with Sarah

Sarah Palin wants to meet me! According to RNC yenta Peter Terpulek, Sarah and I can get together either in Anaheim or California where “grassroots activists” are gathering.  Here’s the jam-packed sentence that all by itself exhausts the non-Sarah, non-financial

Posted in Politics Tagged with: , , , ,

It’s strange, sure is strange

New possibility for Tea Party campaign song, especially given the latest Christine O’Donnell revelations, based on Bill Maher’s boffo tape from O’Donnell’s appearance on Politically Incorrect in 1999: O’DONNELL: I dabbled into witchcraft — I never joined a coven. But

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Shorter Everyone

Giving the condensed version of yet another “I know you are, but what am I” column, this one from Dennis Prager, the foul (really) enemies-within (your head) at Sadly, No! summed up the conservative unity position on everything these days

Posted in Politics Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Horror, The Horror

In a Facebook post entitled “Journey into the Media’s Heart of Darkness,” Sarah Palin writes of a “dark and demented conspiracy,” but no evidence of such a conspiracy appears in the material she references – 15 pages of e-mail exchanges

Posted in Miscellany Tagged with: , , , , ,

Bleeding Heart Conservatives

This is not an issue of religious tolerance but of common moral sense. To build a mosque at Ground Zero is a stab in the heart of the families of the innocent victims of those horrific attacks. Sarah Palin likes

Posted in Religion Tagged with: , , ,

All the little Tea Party Americans in the world

How odd and telling that in a Facebook post responding to an NAACP resolution on supposed Tea Party racism, Sarah Palin would create a new victimary group:  “Tea Party Americans.”  Palin uses this phrase five times in the post, even

Posted in Politics Tagged with: , , ,

From the Featured Archives

Noted & Quoted

TV pundits and op-ed writers of every major newspaper epitomize how the Democratic establishment has already reached a consensus: the 2020 nominee must be a centrist, a Joe Biden, Cory Booker or Kamala Harris–type, preferably. They say that Joe Biden should "run because [his] populist image fits the Democrats’ most successful political strategy of the past generation" (David Leonhardt, New York Times), and though Biden "would be far from an ideal president," he "looks most like the person who could beat Trump" (David Ignatius, Washington Post). Likewise, the same elite pundit class is working overtime to torpedo left-Democratic candidates like Sanders.

For someone who was not acquainted with Piketty's paper, the argument for a centrist Democrat might sound compelling. If the country has tilted to the right, should we elect a candidate closer to the middle than the fringe? If the electorate resembles a left-to-right line, and each voter has a bracketed range of acceptability in which they vote, this would make perfect sense. The only problem is that it doesn't work like that, as Piketty shows.

The reason is that nominating centrist Democrats who don't speak to class issues will result in a great swathe of voters simply not voting. Conversely, right-wing candidates who speak to class issues, but who do so by harnessing a false consciousness — i.e. blaming immigrants and minorities for capitalism's ills, rather than capitalists — will win those same voters who would have voted for a more class-conscious left candidate. Piketty calls this a "bifurcated" voting situation, meaning many voters will connect either with far-right xenophobic nationalists or left-egalitarian internationalists, but perhaps nothing in-between.

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Understanding Trump’s charisma offers important clues to understanding the problems that the Democrats need to address. Most important, the Democratic candidate must convey a sense that he or she will fulfil the promise of 2008: not piecemeal reform but a genuine, full-scale change in America’s way of thinking. It’s also crucial to recognise that, like Britain, America is at a turning point and must go in one direction or another. Finally, the candidate must speak to Americans’ sense of self-respect linked to social justice and inclusion. While Weber’s analysis of charisma arose from the German situation, it has special relevance to the United States of America, the first mass democracy, whose Constitution invented the institution of the presidency as a recognition of the indispensable role that unique individuals play in history.

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[E]ven Fox didn’t tout Bartiromo’s big scoops on Trump’s legislative agenda, because 10 months into the Trump presidency, nobody is so foolish as to believe that him saying, “We’re doing a big infrastructure bill,” means that the Trump administration is, in fact, doing a big infrastructure bill. The president just mouths off at turns ignorantly and dishonestly, and nobody pays much attention to it unless he says something unusually inflammatory.On some level, it’s a little bit funny. On another level, Puerto Rico is still languishing in the dark without power (and in many cases without safe drinking water) with no end in sight. Trump is less popular at this point in his administration than any previous president despite a generally benign economic climate, and shows no sign of changing course. Perhaps it will all work out for the best, and someday we’ll look back and chuckle about the time when we had a president who didn’t know anything about anything that was happening and could never be counted on to make coherent, factual statements on any subject. But traditionally, we haven’t elected presidents like that — for what have always seemed like pretty good reasons — and the risks of compounding disaster are still very much out there.

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